All posts by Kurt Kirton

About Kurt Kirton

Song and book writer from MS now living in Nashville, TN. Marketing and graphic design background. Regular blogger on topics surrounding the subject of job searching.

4 Hot Interview Trends Job Seekers Should Be Aware Of (GUEST POST)

4 Hot Interview Trends Job Seekers Should Be Aware Of
Photo by Liz Bukowski

Some job interview trends stay, and some trends go. I have the unique inside knowledge of private sector job interview trends to know which will play a bigger role in the future of job interviewing. Let’s explore four hot interview trends and some ways for today’s professionals to prepare for them.

1) Skype Interviews: Skype interviews are becoming more prevalent especially with advances in technology. As technology continues to advance at a rapid pace and companies are constantly searching for cost savings, it’s safe to say that Skype interviews are not going away for a long time.

I’ve seen many “How to Skype Interview” videos on YouTube. Matt Gnaizd’s video is one of the best. It covers Skype interview basics such as proper sound, lighting, professional dress, potential distractions, posture, eye contact, computer set up, and appropriate speech. Professional screen names are a must, and make sure to have a strong Internet connection.

2) Quirky Questions: I was doing a career presentation at a small college last year. At the end of the presentation I asked if any of the students had any questions. One asked, “How do I answer the tree question?” The scenario went something like the following, “If you were a tree, what would it be, and why?” Questions like this have a particular purpose in interviews, and it’s important to know why they are being asked.

Quirky questions don’t necessary have a right or wrong answer. The candidate mainly needs to make sure to at least come forward with an answer. The worst thing an interviewee can say is “I don’t know,” or, “That’s a weird question.” The interviewer wants to see the interviewee’s analytical skills, sense of humor, professionalism, creativity, and how well he or she thinks on his or her feet.

3) Group Interviews: Most of us hate group interviews. They are not necessarily a new trend, but they are becoming even more popular. Companies are consistently looking for ways to reduce expenses and increase revenues, and group interviews are cost effective measures for companies.

Most people are naturally nervous during a job interview, but if you’ve researched the company, participated in mock interviews, and practiced the most commonly asked interview questions, you can be more confident and less nervous. Wondering how to address a panel? If one panel member is asking the questions, the student should focus on that member but should also speak to the other members on the panel with good eye contact. Afterwards, you’ll need to send individual thank you letters to each member in the group.

4) Video Profiles: Video profiles may be required by a company, or some job seekers may choose to create one in order to set them apart from the competition. When produced well, they can be a phenomenal tool or additional advantage.

Professional dress, proper lighting & sound, eye contact, and an appropriate background are all necessary elements. Hiring committees that require a video profile generally have specific instructions on what they want the candidate to address on camera. For the most part, video profiles are typically a short 2-minute introduction of yourself. In other words, answer the popular question, “Tell me about yourself.”

Who would have ever thought that job interviews would be conducted in noisy venues like Starbucks? Who would have imaged 15 years ago a program called Skype would change the way we conduct job interviews? It’s important for job seekers to keep up on these trends so they can be prepared and best present themselves.

About the Author:
Zachariah Ballinger is Amazon’s best selling author of the book, The Hot Seat: How to Meet the Challenge of a New Era in Job Interviewing. He is a motivational speaker, an educator, and a career consultant. Zachariah Ballinger was featured as the keynote speaker on career topics at TACE, LACE, & AACE (Tennessee, Louisiana, & Alabama Associations of Colleges and Employers.) Contact him at www.topthehotseat.com, and follow him on Instagram and Facebook.

 

Looking for a new job? Want to get what you want fast? Check out my book, Here Today, Hired Tomorrow, and subscribe to my blog (kurtkirton.com) for free advice on your job search.

What You Need to Know to “Go Solar” (Guest Post)

What You Need To Know To Go SolarI just had more panels added to my 15-panel solar system; the photo above is the installers wiring the additional 10 on the roof of my garage. Solar energy is a near and dear subject to my heart. People ask me regularly about solar energy…new solar technology/hardware, how it works with my home, and the cost of a system. Matt Reilly contacted me recently about guest-posting, and I thought this topic would fit in nicely with the “and positive life tips” part of my blog. Read on.   –Kurt

All the energy that the world uses every day could be replaced with solar. It’s no wonder then that more and more people want to take advantage of this valuable natural resource. By going solar, you can significantly reduce your carbon footprint on this planet and will be surprised how much money you could save on utilities.

But before you jump on the solar bandwagon, there are some important things to consider and aspects you need to understand first.

Are there any codes or regulations on installing solar panels in your area?

Before you start planning anything, calculating costs, and researching where to buy, you need to do some homework. There can be some rules and codes in your local area that regulate or restrict the usage and installation of solar panels. For example, fire codes could be in place restricting the number panels on roofs due to potential fire hazards.

There can also be certain permits you will need to have. They can be permits for the installation itself, for the kind of solar panels you want, a permit that regulates the areas in which you can install them, and how many you’re allowed to install.

Does your house receive enough sunlight, and is your roof suitable for solar panels?

Consider how much sunlight your part of the country receives. The number of sunny days per year will play a big role in how much power the panels will be able to generate, whether that is enough for your household needs and, in the end, how much money you will be able to save on utility bills.

It’s also important to consider the position of your house in relation to the sun. There should be no major obstacles too near your house that create shade and block direct sunlight, such as tall trees or branches over your roof.

If your roof is older than about 10 years and will need some repair or replacement soon, think carefully about installing the panels. The best option would probably be to wait until the roof is upgraded or replaced before the system is installed. Along with the condition of the roof, its slope and orientation are also important. The ideal would be if you have a decent sized portion of the roof facing south at a 7/12th’s pitch on which to mount the panels.

Hiring a contractor

If you’re a skilled handy person with some experience, tools, and have done similar work, you can install the panels yourself. There are many guides and DIY instructions, and if you study them well and are careful, it’s possible. However, as far as local regulations and codes, there are some areas that require an expert or an electrician to install some of the system or to do certain parts of the job—and it’s a wise idea to consult a professional for guidance when purchasing supplies. If you decide to hire a roofing contractor to take care of the whole process, make sure you hire properly licensed and authorized professionals.

Are there any financial incentives?

Even though in the end a solar system pays off in more ways than one, it can be a costly process. The panels themselves and the installation can be expensive, and you may need to take out a loan. But first, check if there are any federal, state, or local incentives in place. There are some government tax breaks, financial incentives, and rebates, and you might just be in luck.

About the Author: Matt Reilly is a writer and editor on home improvement, smart technology, and sustainable solutions for Reilly Roofing and Gutters.

Looking for a new job? Want to get what you want fast? Check out my book, Here Today, Hired Tomorrow (kurtkirton.com/hthtbook), and subscribe to my blog (kurtkirton.com) for free  advice on your job search – www.bit.ly/kwknewsltr

Top 10 Tips for a Successful International Trip

Top 10 International Travel Tips
photo by Pablo Suárez

There’s a World Atlas from 1977 on my bookshelf that shows countries that don’t exist anymore. Despite it’s antiquity, this book gets more use than you’d think! I’ve been very blessed to have had the resources to take seven international trips in my life, and I use that atlas to plan my travel. I’m a country boy from Terry, MS, and I never dreamed as a kid that over the past fifteen years I’d see so much of the world I studied about in school.

I’d recommend international travel to anyone. Here’s why. It will exhaust you, yet refresh you. It’ll give you something extra not only to look forward to but something that makes life worth living. This kind of travel makes you appreciate your own country and educate you as to the plights and wonders of other countries—expands your world view, if you will. More often than not you’ll find that the kindness of the people you meet will stand out in your memories above the touristy places you’ll see.

From the glittering night shore of Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro to the breathtaking mountain vistas of northern Colombia, I’ve been blessed to see some of the most beautiful sites in the world. And I’ve met people that have enriched my life and spoiled me with their kindness and hospitality as I explored their countries.

So now that I’ve got you jazzed up to hit the road, I want to share what I’ve learned about preparing to travel that can make your trip easier and less stressful. Here are some important tips to keep in mind as you plan your trip (and some of these can be applied to domestic or business trips as well.)

1) Itinerary – Regardless of whether your friends think you’re too structured, plan your trip—at least to an extent. Talk to people, read travel guides, and use tripadvisor.com to get an idea of what you’d like to do in each city. Research! Does the country require a Visa? Are there certain times of the year to avoid to save money (Carnival, Easter, local holidays, etc.) When is the weather not too hot or cold? What is the local time zone? Will you need to bring or buy an AC adapter for your electronics? Start planning at least six months prior to your target departure so you can plan during your leisure time.

Keep a copy of the main page of your passport with your itinerary. With this it’s easier and faster for your Embassy to help you get another passport in the event you lose it.

2) Language – If you’re going to a country where your native language is not prevalent, brush up on key phrases (e.g. “Where is the restroom?” or “How much does this cost?”) Google translate even has a button you can click to hear pronunciation.

Ibirapuera Park
Ibirapuera Park – Sao Paulo, Brazil

3) Flights – Use your credit card points for a discount. You’ll probably have to buy tickets through your credit card company’s interface, but you could save hundreds. Don’t feel like you have to return home from the first city in which you landed. Not only will this save you time, but it may cost less than you think. If you’re seeing several cities, start with the furthest, and work your way back. Flying home from the closest city to yours will make for a shorter flight when you are tired and just ready to be home.

Price “broken tickets,” i.e. using Delta to fly into city #1 and out of city #3 and use a local airline for the middle flight; sometimes this is cheaper than buying a circuit of airfare between all cities from a big carrier.

Pay careful attention to your gate number. Some smaller airlines, while cheap, may change your gate number between when you get it and your boarding time—it’s happened to me!

4) Packing – Don’t over pack. Try to get it all in a medium-sized suitcase, and bring a backpack or satchel for use on the plane as a carry on and to take your convenience items around each day. You can cut the amount of clothes you’ll need in half by packing a detergent pod and doing a load of laundry halfway through your trip. Put your crucial items in your carry on in case your checked luggage is lost or delayed.

Mecardo de la Merced
Mecardo de la Merced (bazaar) – Mexico City, Mexico

5) Money – About a week from leaving, alert your bank and credit card company of the dates and places that you’ll be travelling. This way they don’t shut off access to your accounts assuming there is fraudulent activity happening. Bring only enough cash with you to have a bit for your expenses coming and going from your native country, but use the ATM upon arrival to get cash in the native currency. Yes, your bank* will charge a small fee for each withdrawal, but this is better than bringing travelers checks which many shops and restaurants may reject. Add the exchange rate to your itinerary the day before you leave so you can remember what it was. Remember to exchange any money you haven’t spent before your departing flight; international airports always have a currency exchange.

Include a budget in your itinerary. You’ll need it to have a rough idea of how much to save for your trip. This should include not only the cost of airfare and hotels, but in-city travel such as bus, subway, and taxi fare; money for shopping and admissions to attractions; food; Passport; Visa (if necessary); and traveler’s insurance.

*I highly recommend the Kasasa checking account at Main Street Bank. It pays 2.25% interest on your checking balance and give you 2% cash back on your ATM/Debit card purchases if you can meet a few criteria each cycle. I just changed my local checking account to Main Street and am very happy. Check it out for more information.

6) Safety & Health – Be aware of your surroundings, especially at night. Walk around with friends, and get off the bus as close to your destination as possible. Leave your Passport in your main bag at your room; don’t carry it around with you as an ID; use your drivers license for that. If mugged, scream or start yelling to attract attention to yourself and make the attacker flee. If he has a weapon, don’t fight back.

If chased, run to a public place like a museum, bar, or restaurant, and call the police. Never smell anything someone you don’t know asks you to (there’s a drug that can incapacitate you.) You may need to wear your backpack on your chest if you’re, say, in an outdoor flea market that is subject to pickpockets or grab-and-run thieves.

Never eat food from a beach vendor that a local friend does not approve. Frequently this food has not been kept at a proper temperature for many hours and can be a top source of food poisoning. Likewise, try to steer clear of street vendor food, especially if you have a sensitive stomach.

As soon as you buy your airfare and know what other items you’ll pay for prior to departure, buy travelers insurance. You never know when you might be injured, have items stolen, or become sick enough to want to see a doctor. I’ve always used Travel Guard, and like their rates and options. The level of coverage you should choose will depend on the riskiness of the country to which your travelling (e.g. Colombia vs. Canada.)

If in a risky country, stick mostly to using cash, not your credit card. You never know when a waiter is going to write down your card info and use it later.

Let your neighbor know the dates of your trip so he or she can watch out for suspicious activity and possibly park an extra car in your driveway. You may even consider using a timer on a light to give the appearance you’re home. Don’t post to your social accounts that you’re leaving so that people don’t know you’re not at home.

Use hand sanitizer after holding on to bus or subway rails and especially before you eat if there’s not a way to wash up beforehand. Put a luggage lock on your bag if you are checking one.

Casa Oniri Hotel Boutique
Casa Oniri Hotel Boutique – Barichara, Colombia

7) Water – Stay hydrated on the plane to avoid headaches, etc. Plan to buy large bottled water(s) on your first day—but only enough for the days you’ll be in that city. Any more and you’ll have to throw it away at airport security. Keep your small water bottle so you can refill it from the one you bought and bring it along each day. Due to the quality of some destinations’ tap water, use bottled water to brush your teeth or clean your contact lenses if you’re in a country like Mexico or India where ingesting the water is ill-advised. Keeping hydrated will help stave off constipation as well as well.

8) Communication – Use your smartphone as a wifi device to Skype, check your email, email loved ones that you’ve arrived alright, and in some cases, text for free. Check with your cell phone carrier prior to leaving about the cost of using your phone in the countries you’ll visit. At work, change your phone greeting so callers know the date you’ll return, and set up an out of office alert on your email. Remember to change both back.

London Eye/River Thames
London Eye/River Thames – London, England

9) Sickness – Pack Zicam (and maybe your treatment of choice) in case you feel a cold coming on. To avoid becoming sick during your flights, try these tips. Tray tables have been used to change diapers and many surfaces are not sanitized when planes are cleaned, so use hand sanitizer before eating. Keep your fingers out of your nose and eyes. Never use plane restroom water to rinse your contact lenses: It’s non-potable water and full of germs. Point the A/C vent away from your nose. Wear a scarf to keep your neck warm, and get up every couple of hours and walk around to keep the blood flowing (and your immune system up.)

10) Flexibility – Let me tell ya, unexpected things will happen; you can count on it! I’ve had friends I came to see cancel, an airline go under and thwart my visit to paradise in Santorini, rain ruin my beach side trip, a bad cold send me to the doctor—twice!, and my stuff stolen—also twice. So be flexible. Make alternate plans. Spend a little extra money if you need to substitute something else last minute. Breathe, and people watch or journal if you’re subjected to a wait longer than expected. Stay positive. After all, this is your vacation; you don’t want to sit fuming and angry for days on end because of disappointments.

St. Mark's Basilica
St. Mark’s Basilica – Venice, Italy

BONUS – Packing! Don’t forget to bring:
• Airborne
• Anti-mosquito cream (the healthy version of this can be made with hand lotion and eucalyptus oil)
• All charger cords (& AC adapters for the countries you’ll visit if needed)
• Earplugs (great if you’re using the Euro-rail, need to sleep in a noisy environment, or want to keep out water when swimming)
• Hand sanitizer or sanitizer wipes
• Laundry detergent pod
• Logins for your email, Facebook, etc. accounts
• Luggage lock & key
• Passport (and Visa if necessary) and a copy of it
• Pencil or pen
• Pills/meds/vitamins
• Sunglasses
• Sunscreen
• Swimwear and swim items such as flip flops and goggles
• Trip info – all addresses, phone numbers, flight details, email addresses, etc.
• Walking shoes
• Water bottle, small and empty
• Zicam, your favorite cold medicine, and muscle cream (e.g. Icy Hot)

So spin a globe or crack open an atlas, and dream about where you want to go. Save what you need so you can get there debt free. And with a reasonable amount of preparation, you can create a safe and fairly stress free trip. After all, haven’t you earned a vacation?

 

Looking for a new job? Want to get what you want fast? Check out my book, Here Today, Hired Tomorrow, and subscribe to my blog (kurtkirton.com) for free advice on your job search.